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Encyclopaedia Judaica

Racist Zionist organization in Latin America

Argentina - Brazil - Chile - Columbia - Ecuador - Mexico - Paraguay - Peru - Uruguay - Venezuela - Central America

from: Zionism; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica 1971, vol. 16

presented by Michael Palomino (2008)

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[[Introduction
Racist Zionist madness says that Jewry would be a "nation" which is never possible because Jewry is a religion. Add to this the Arabs were never asked if a "Jewish State" would be built. But many Jews believed the Jewish racist Zionists and warmongers, called "Zionists" with it's racist Herzl booklet "The Jewish State". Zionist racism is legal until now (2008) and their racist books like "The Jewish State" from racist Herzl are not forbidden...]

[Congresses and meetings since 1945 - the "new Zionist generations"]

<The [[racist]] Zionist movement in Latin America grew with the development of the continent's Jewish communities. In most countries Jewish communal and [[racist]] Zionist institutions collaborated from the start, and from the time of the struggle for independence and the establishment of the [[racist]] State of Israel the activities of the [[racist]] Zionist movement have expanded to continental proportions. The movement has sponsored such major continental gatherings as the first [[racist]] Zionist congress in Montevideo (1945); the second [[racist]] Zionist congress in Buenos Aires (1950); the first Jewish Latin American youth convention (Montevideo 1961); a conference convened after the Six-Day War that brought together 527 delegates from Argentina, Uruguay, Chile, Paraguay, and Peru (Nov. 1967); and a South American encounter for the new [[racist]] Zionist generations (Buenos Aires, April 1970).

<Argentina

Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): [[racist]] Zionism,
                  vol. 16, col. 1124: The [[racist Zionist]] League for
                  Erez Israel Labor at the Jewish settlement in
                  Bernasconi, La Pampa province, Argentina, celebrating
                  the harvesting of a crop for the benefit of Palestine,
                  1934. Courtesy C.A.H.J.P., Jerusalem
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): [[racist]] Zionism, vol. 16,  col. 1124: The [[racist Zionist]] League for Erez Israel Labor at the Jewish settlement in Bernasconi, La Pampa province, Argentina, celebrating the harvesting of a crop for the benefit of Palestine, 1934. Courtesy C.A.H.J.P., Jerusalem


[Racist Zionist groups in Argentina since 1897 - racist Zionist newspapers]

[[Racist]] Zionist groups arose in Buenos Aries and in the interior simultaneously with the organization of the First [[racist]] Zionist Congress in Basle. The oldest group (established 1897) was Sion. The [[racist]] Dr. Theodor Herzl League was also influential for several years. As the movement grew, its activities were coordinated by a Federación (established 1904), a central institution which was an extension of the [[racist]] Herzl League.

In 1908 it was replaced by Tifereth Zion. The movement's leadership developed within the framework of the [[racist]] Federación Sionista Argentina (established 1913), whose first leaders were Jacobo Joselevich, Nathan Gezang, and Solomon Liebeshutz.

during the early stages of its development, the movement did not tend toward internal political polarization. There were, however, lesser organizations which espoused particular ideological trends: [[racist]] Herut (Ḥerut), Socialist Territorialists (established 1905); [[racist]] S.S., [[racist]] Social Zionists (established 1906); and a [[racist]] Borochovist group, [[racist]] Po'alei Zion (est. 1909), and [[racist]] Ze'irei (Ẓe'irei) Zion and its [[racist]] periodical Di Naye Tzait [[The New Times]], established 1918, still exists.

The other major local party is the [[racist]] General Zionists, whose official [[racist]] publication is El Estado Judío [[The Jewish State]]. Ha-Shomer ha-Za'ir (ha-Ẓa'ir), particularly active after World War II, publishes the  [[racist]] Nueva Sion [[New Zion]] (established 1947). The (col. 1123)

[[racist]] Revisionist party (established 1930), which increased its organizational cadres during the struggle of the yishuv [[Jews in Palestine before 1948]] against the [[racist Empire]] British administration in Palestine, puts out [[the racist newspaper]] La idea Sionista. Mizrachi was established in 1940 on the foundations of previously organized smaller groups.

These parties have sponsored the creation of youth movements which have made significant contributions in the areas of Jewish education and aliyah. Women's organizations of each party, as well as WIZO, are also active. The [[racist]] Consejo Central Sionista [[Central Zionist Council]] (established 1948), in which all local [[racist]] Zionist institutions are represented, arose from the reorganization of the [[racist]] Zionist parties and the creation of a Comisión Coordinadora [[Coordination Commission]] (established 1940). As of 1951 it has undertaken functions previously carried out by the Jewish Agency (established 1937, for Argentina and Latin America). Delegates from Argentina have attended [[racist]] Zionist Congresses since 1925; their presence in previous years had been sporadic. The [[racist]] Zionist Organization of Argentina became one of the central organizations of Argentine Jewry.> (col. 1124)

[[Addition: Jewish emigration waves to Argentina

The massive Jewish immigration waves to Argentina after 1881 and  1930-1945 and from Egypt after 1956 after the Sinai campaign of the racist Jewish army are not mentioned. There seems having been a big censorship within the Encyclopaedia Judaica in the Zionism article. See here the facts:

<1890-1918. Large-scale Jewish immigration to Argentina began only in the late 1880s, when echoes of Argentina's prodigious efforts to attract immigration reached Eastern Europe. Arriving singly at first, Jews later came in groups, the largest of which (arriving ion the S.S. Weser on Aug. 14, 1889) laid the foundation for agricultural settlements (see Agricultural Settlement). Immigration increased after the *Jewish Colonization Association (ICA) was established, reaching a peak of over 13,000 persons per year in 1906 and 1912. Most of these immigrants were Ashkenazim, but a small minority of Sephardim came from the Ottoman Empire and North Africa.>
(from: Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Argentina, Vol. 3, col. 413, Argentina 1890-1918)

<From 1933 to 1943 between 20,000 and 30,000 Jews entered Argentina by exploiting various loopholes in the law. Between 6,000 and 10,000 of them had to use illegal means to immigrate and their legal status was (col. 415)

regulated only after a general amnesty was declared for illegal immigrants in 1948. When news of the Holocaust reached Argentina in 1943, Jewish organizations managed to convince the government to accept 1,000 Jewish children, but for various reasons this rescue operation was never carried out.>
(from: Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Argentina, Vol. 3, col. 416, Argentina 1930-1946)

< Thirty-five thousand Egyptian Jews live in Israel and there are about 15,000 in Brazil, 10,000 in France, 9,000 in the United States, 9,000 in Argentina, and 4,000 in Great Britain.>
(from: Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Egypt; Vol. 6, col. 501, Egypt 06: 1945-1970)

Concerning the counting of 1960 Argentina Jewry is estimated the second largest Jewish community in the western hemisphere, and they lived in peace:

<The emergence of Argentinian Jewry as the second largest Jewish community in the western hemisphere is a 20th-century development. The following table shows the evolution of the Jewish population since 1869, when the first census was taken:

Table 1. Total Jewish population in Argentina, 1869 to 1968
Year
xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Total population
Jewish population
[[counted by census]]
Estimated Jewish Jewish population
Percent of the Jewish population
1869
1,737,076xxx
-
1,000xxxxxxxx
-
1895
3,954,911xxx 6,085xxxxxxxxx
-
1.0% [?]xxx
1914
7,885,273xxx -
100-117,000xxxxxxxx 1.2-1.4%xxxxxx
1947
15,893,827xxx 249,330xxxxxxxxx 265-275,000xxxxxxxx 1.6-1.7%xxxxxx
1960
20,008,945xxx 275,913xxxxxxxxx 400-450,000xxxxxxxx 1.9-2.2%xxxxxx
1968
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
400-500,000xxxxxxxx
from: Argentina; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica, Vol. 3, col. 418

[Total of Jews in Argentina: The errors of the census of 1960 - many more Jews estimated]

The census figures contain a large margin of error and must be augmented. Thus, the first census, held on Oct. 39, 1960, in addition to accounting for about 276,000 Jews, also revealed around 930,000 persons who declared themselves as not belonging to a religious denomination or did not specify their religion. The latter group probably contains a large proportion of Jews.

Moreover, the census was held on the eve of the Day of Atonement, and a considerable number of Jews could not fill in the returns. Unfortunately, it is impossible to determine with any degree of precision the margin of underestimation. The present size of the Jewish population of Argentina is  variously reported to be between 400,000 and 450,000, or even 500,000, but all these figures are based on highly conjectural estimates.

It has been estimated that about 90% of the present Jewish population under 40 years of age is Argentinian-born. Among those aged 40 and over, 72% are foreign born, 17% have one foreign-born parent, and 8% are Argentinian-born. Some 85% of the total Jewish population are of Ashkenazi origin, and 15% are of Sephardi origin.>
(from: Argentina; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica, Vol. 3, col. 418; Argentina 1946-1968)

It seems strange that these emigration waves are missing in the Zionist article. Perhaps the emigration waves are missing in the "Zionism" article because the emigration waves to Argentina are a sign for Jewish intelligence not to migrate to Palestine into an eternal war trap which is called "Israel". There was no big emigration wave to the eternal war zone of Palestine against the Arabs since 1948. The Jews in Argentina live in peace. It seems Argentina was a refuge for Jews who did not want to be bothered by the racist Zionist madness]].



<Brazil

[Racist Zionist organizations and newspapers - structures before and after Second World War]

The first [[racist]] Zionist organizations, Tifereth Zioni and Ahavath Zion (1916-17) sprang up in São Paolo and Rio de Janeiro. Smaller centers were also established in the northern provinces. With the founding of the [[racist]] Zionist Organization (1921), a degree of coordination was attained, including collaboration between Ashkenazim and Sephardim.

During World War II, when Brazil imposed legislation restricting the internal development of national minorities, the [[racist]] Zionist movement was officially closed down (1938), but it nevertheless continued its activities on a limited scale until 1945, when its legal status was renewed. The reorganized [[racist]] Zionist political parties coordinated into the [[racist]] United Zionist Organization (established 1945). The most influential of these parties were Mapai (organized in the 1920s), [[racist]] General Zionists (since 1947), and the [[racist]] Revisionists. The Keren Hayesod was reorganized in 1946.

The movement encountered difficulties which derived from the complex internal organization of the Jewish community; local autonomous trends and a division according to countries of origin interfered with its collaboration with a centralized communal organization. Nevertheless, communal institutions in the state of São Paolo consolidated their activities with the [[racist]] Zionist Organization in support of the Jewish state and to aid European Jewry. the assimilation of Jewish sectors into Brazilian society, a growing manifestation during and subsequent to World War II, was a contributing factor to the limited influence of the movement during those years. There has been an upswing in the local [[racist]] Zionist movement since the 1950s, particularly after the Six-Day War (1967).> (col. 1124)

[[Addition: Jewish emigration waves to Brazil

The Jewish immigration waves to Argentina after 1881 and  1930-1945 and from Egypt after 1956 after the Sinai campaign of the racist Jewish army are not mentioned. There seems having been a big censorship within the Encyclopaedia Judaica in the Zionism article. See here the facts:

-- Jewish agriculture settlements under the leadership of the Jewish Colonial Association (ICA): *Brazil

-- <in the decade from 1920 to 1930, 28,820 Jews entered the country, mostly from eastern Europe>
(from: Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Brazil, Vol. 4, col. 1328, *Brazil)

-- <some 17,500 Jews entered Brazil between 1933 and 1939. In 1940 the Brazilian government, at the request of the Vatican, permitted the entry of 3,000 German refugees who had converted to Catholicism.>
(from: Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Brazil, Vol. 4, col. 1329, *Brazil)

-- <In the period 1956-57, 2,500 Jews from Egypt, and about 1,000 from North Africa (mainly from Morocco) were admitted, and from time to time smaller groups were able to enter the country.>
(from: Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Brazil, Vol. 4, col. 1329, *Brazil)

-- <In 1969, the size of the Jewish population was estimated at 130,000 to 140,000 spread over the large cities: Rio de Janeiro (50,000), São Paulo (50-55,000), Pôrto Alegre (12,000), Belo Horizonte (3,000), Recife (1,600), Curitiba (1,300), Belém (1,200) and Bahia (800). There were 80 families in the new capital Brasilia, and Jews were living in smaller numbers in various other towns.>
(from: Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Brazil, Vol. 4, col. 1329, *Brazil)

-- < Thirty-five thousand Egyptian Jews live in Israel and there are about 15,000 in Brazil, 10,000 in France, 9,000 in the United States, 9,000 in Argentina, and 4,000 in Great Britain.>
( from: Egypt; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica 1971, Vol. 6, col. 501, *Egypt 1945-1970)

It seems strange that these emigration waves are missing in the Zionist article. Perhaps the emigration waves are missing in the "Zionism" article because the emigration waves to Brazil are a sign for Jewish intelligence not to migrate to Palestine into an eternal war trap which is called "Israel". Brazil was not the aim of racist Zionism, but the Jews there live in peace...]]



Chile

[Racist Zionist organizations in Chile since 1911]

Chile's flourishing Jewish community has attained a strong internal organization in which the [[racist]] Zionist movement wields authority and influence. The earlies [[racist]] Zionist initiatives were sporadic. The first stable group was formed in 1911 by members maintaining contact with the Argentinian [[racist]] Zionist movement. An influential figure during this early period was Mauricio Baltiansky.

From the first [[racist]] Zionist convention in 1919, the movement became more firmly established. The major blocs were Po'alei Zion (established 1916) and the [[racist]] General Zionist Party (1947). Since the 1930s all [[racist]] Zionist parties and factions have increasingly polarized within the local movement. These include the Pro-Palestine Labor League (1931), the Revisionists (1932), and Mizrachi. Smaller groups such as the Folksfarband [[People's Association]] and the Grupo Hebraista [[Hebrew Group]] formed the opposition. Active pioneer organizations are Ivriah (1930), Betar (1933), Benei Akiva (1940), Kadimah (1944) - from which Ha-Shomer ha-Za'ir (Ẓa'ir) grew - Deror-He-Halutz (Ḥalutz), and Ihud ha-No'ar ha-Halutzi (Iḥud ha-No'ar ha-Ḥalutzi) (1950) of the Po'alei Zion-Hitahadut (Hitaḥadut). [[Racist]] Zionist women's organizations are WIZO (1926) and Pioneer Women (1949).

[Connections and cooperations of the racist Zionist organizations of Chile]

The firmly organized [[racist]] Zionist Federation of Chile (established 1919) incorporates all political and [[racist]] Zionist organizations, the United Jewish Appeal, and every institution which, if not specifically [[racist]] Zionist, nonetheless identifies with the movement's objectives. Together with the Jewish representative body, the Comité Representativo, it engages in nationwide Jewish education, is involved with cultural activities, and participates in the Central Committee for Jewish Education (established 1946). It sponsors the Instituto Chileno-Israelita de Cultura (established 1950), which is associated with the Comisión de Cooperación intellectual of the University of Chile. It has also carried out an intensive campaign of political explanation within non-Jewish circles, particularly since World War II and the creation of the
[[racist Zionist Free Mason CIA Herzl]] State of Israel.

[[Addition: Jewish emigration waves to Chile

There were several Jewish immigration waves to Chile:

-- first Chile was refugee country for Marranos and then partly victims by "Christian" inquisition
-- Jewish immigrants from Russia came from Argentina
-- racist Zionism was confronted with Jewish communism and anti-Zionism
-- Jewish German refugees were admitted only in the South of Chile
(see: *Chile 1535-1945)
-- and after 1945 there were more Arabs (<100,000 citizens of Arab descent live in Chile and are known for their financial and political influence>) in Chile than Jews (<30,000> for 1970)
-- and add to this there are German Nazi refugees in Chile since 1944/1945
-- and there was no great emigration wave to racist Herzl Israel
(see *Chile 1945-1970)

This interesting mixture in Chile seems not worth to be mentioned in the Zionism article. There was no emigration wave to the eternal war zone of Palestine against the Arabs since 1948. The Jews in Chile live more or less in peace. It seems that  Chile was a refuge for Jews who did not want to be bothered by the racist Zionist madness]].



<Colombia [Engl.: Columbia]

[Jews from Palestine and German Jews - anti-Zionist Columbian government against "ethnic islands"]

The communal life of this small Jewish community, composed of Sephardim who emigrated from Palestine during the crisis years of the 1920s, German-speaking Ashkenazi immigrants arriving since World War I, and refugees from Nazi persecution, was organized with difficulty. The [[racist]] Zionist movement also had a slow beginning due to the restrictive measures adopted by the authorities to prevent the formation of "ethnic islands".

The (col. 1124)

[[racist]] Federación Sionista [[Zionist Federation]], together with the Comité Central [[Zentral Committee]] (established 1936), adopted measures against anti-Semitism and racial discrimination.> (col. 1125)

[[Jewish life in Columbia was not so easy, above all in the Nazi times, and then a part of the Jews were following the racist Zionist calls for emigration to racist Zionist Free Mason CIA Herzl Israel, see *Columbia]].



Ecuador and Paraguay.

[Zionist organizations]

The respective organizations of Ecuador and Paraguay enjoy a limited membership, and they work together with communal institutions. Paraguay, whose minute Jewish population is preponderantly pro-Zionist, has seen an increase in activities in the wake of the Six-Day War.

[[Addition: Emigration waves to Ecuador and Paraguay

In Ecuador the Jewish community provided some industrial developments, see *Ecuador. In Paraguay there were immigration waves during the Nazi times and after WWII:

-- < Between 1933 and 1939 between 15,000 and 20,000 Jews from Germany, Austria, and Czechoslovakia took advantage of Paraguay's liberal immigration laws to escape from Nazi Europe.>
-- < After world War II a last group of immigrants, mostly survivors from the concentration camps, arrived.>
(from: Paraguay; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica 1971, Vol. 13, col. 86)

Jewish and Nazi refugees were confronted again in the country after 1945, because also German Nazis were admitted as refugees in Paraguay:

-- <There are also some 40,000 Germans or people of German descent, many of whom had openly supported the Nazis before and during World War II. A number of prominent Nazis, among them Dr. J. *Mengele of *Auschwitz, found temporary shelter in Paraguay.>
(from: Paraguay; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica 1971, Vol. 13, col. 86)

It seems strange that these emigration waves are missing in the Zionist article. Perhaps the emigration waves are missing in the "Zionism" article because the emigration waves to Paraguay are a sign for Jewish intelligence not to migrate to Palestine into an eternal war trap which is called "Israel". There was no emigration wave to the eternal war zone of Palestine against the Arabs since 1948. The Jews in Paraguay live more or less in peace. It seems that Paraguay was a refuge for Jews who did not want to be bothered by the racist Zionist madness]].



<Mexico

[Racist Zionist associations periodicals and collaborations in Mexico]

Despite the divergences between [[racist]] Zionists and sectors identified with the non-Zionist left, the [[racist]] Zionist movement exerted increasing influence from the 1920s onward. Both blocs collaborated in certain communal activities, particularly those pertaining to education. Prior to institutional [[racist]] Zionist organization, activities ere sporadic (i.e., on behalf of the Balfour Declaration (1917), a Keren Hayesod campaign (1923), etc.).

The first organized group was the Po'alei Zion (1923), which published the first Yiddish publication, Unzer Vort [[Our Word]]. Groups with divergent leanings and bereft of specific partisan character collaborated in the Federación Sionista (1925), which later became affiliated with [[racist]] General Zionism.

Fragmentation into specific parties and [[racist]] Zionist institutions - according to countries of origin or youth and women's sectors - began during the years immediately preceding World War II:
-- Liga Pro-Palestina Obrera [[Pro Palestine Worker's League]] (1934)
-- Pioneras [[Pioneers]] (1935),
-- Revisionists (end of the decade),
-- Organización Sionista Sefardí [[Sefardi Zionist Organization]] (1936, functioning jointly with the Sephardi community),
-- WIZO (1938),
-- Ha-Shomer ha-Za'ir (ha-Ẓa'ir) - the first pioneer organization (1940) -
-- Mizrachi [[religious racist Zionist movement]] (1942),
-- Betar (1946),
-- Benei Akiva (1946),
-- Ha-No'ar ha-Zioni (ha-Ẓioni) (1948),
-- Habonim (1948),
-- Mapam (1948).

The [[racist Zionist]] youth organizations centralized their activities in the Federación Juvenil Sionista [[Jewish Zionist Federation]] (1943). Each of the trends had its own publication:
-- Dos Wort [[Yidd.: The Word]] (1947, Po'alei Zion),
-- Ha-Shomer ha-Za'ir (1942),
-- La Voz Sionista [[Span.: The Zionist Voice]] (1948, General Zionists),
-- Unidad Juvenil [[Span.: Youth Unity]] (Po'alei Zion youth),
-- Avangard (1948, Mapam),
-- Unzer Tribune [[Yidd.: Our Tribune]],
-- and El Heraldo [[Span: The Herald]] (Revisionists),
-- Mizrachi Leben [[Yidd.: Mizrachi Life]] (religious).

The overall organized movement formed the [[racist]] Federación Sionista de Méjico [[Zionist Federation of Mexico]] (established 1950), which has since undertaken central leadership tasks, including those of a local communal nature. An index of the movement's scope are the following figures: approximately 400 organized institutions cooperated in the Emergency Palestine Committee of 1946; in 1954 90% of the Jewish population considered itself [[racist]] Zionist, 8% non-Zionist, and 2% anti-Zionist. The Federación [[Federation]] collaborates with the Comité Central Israelita [[Israelite Central Committee]], a representative communal institution, and with the Instituto de Relaciones Culturales Méjico-Israel [[Mexico-Israel Cultural Relations Institute]].> (col. 1126)



<Peru

[Racist Zionist associations and collaborations in Peru]

The [[racist]] Zionist movement in Peru, established at the end of World War I, encountered initial resistance on the part of the Bund [[Union]] and other leftwing groups in the communal institutions and in the Jewish press. After its establishment (1925) the [[racist]] Zionist Federation collaborated closely with the Unión Israelita del Peru [[Israelite Union of Peru]], an Ashkenazi community functioning since 1924, and with the Sociedad de Sociedades [[Association of Associations]] (1942), representative of the community. Together with the latter, the [[racist]] Zionist Federation sponsors the León Pinelo school (inaugurated 1946).

Jewish public opinion in Peru today is preponderantly pro-Zionist. Jewish university students are organized in the Centro Universitario Peruano-Israelita [[Peruvian Israelite Universitary Center]] (established 1960-61), which was reorganized in 1969 as the Movimiento Universitario Peruano Israelita [[Peruvian Israelite Universitary Movement]]. An independent youth group, Kinneret (est. 1962), sponsors immigration to [[racist Zionist Free Mason CIA Herzl]] Israel and local communal activities. The [[racist]] Zionist Federation has collaborated with the Comité Pro-Palestina [[Pro Palestine Committee]] (1945) and works with the Instituto Cultural Peru-Israel [[Cultural Peru-Israel Institute]].> (col. 1125)

[[There was no emigration wave to the eternal war zone of Palestine against the Arabs since 1948. The Jews in Peru live in peace. It seems that Peru was a refuge for Jews who did not want to be bothered by the racist Zionist madness]].



<Uruguay

Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): [[racist]] Zionism,
                  vol. 16, col. 1125: Central committee of the
                  [[racist]] Zionist Organization in Montevideo with
                  Alexander Goldstein of the Keren Hayesod [[United
                  Israel Appeal for fund raising]] during the Uruguay
                  appeal for the fund, 1921. Courtesy Central Zionist
                  Archives, Jerusalem.
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): [[racist]] Zionism, vol. 16, col. 1125: Central committee of the [[racist]] Zionist Organization in Montevideo with Alexander Goldstein of the Keren Hayesod [[United Israel Appeal for fund raising]] during the Uruguay appeal for the fund, 1921. Courtesy Central Zionist Archives, Jerusalem.

This community of strong [[racist]] Zionist leanings had evolved from groups which have collaborated since the earliest stages of their development. In the first group, Agudath Zion, Israel Tschlenow (1914) brought together [[racist]] Zionists of no particular political leanings. The Sephardim founded the [[racist]]  "Dr. Herzl" group in 1918; [[racist]] Po'alei Zion was established in 1917. Various trends took shape during the 1930s, and the movement expanded. All the [[racist]] Zionist parties and their pioneer movements and women's institutions are locally represented. The Organización Sionista Territorial [[Territorial Zionist Organization]], which encompasses the Federación Juvenil Sionista [[Zionist Youth Federation]], cooperated closely with the Comité Central Israelita [[Israelite Central Committee]], a representative communal institution. It also collaborated with the Comité Uruguayo Pro-Palestina (1940) and later with the Comté Cultural Uruguay-Israel.> (col. 1126)

[[Addition: Jewish immigration waves to Uruguay

The Jewish immigration waves to Uruguay after 1881 and  1930-1945 and from Egypt after 1956 after the Sinai campaign of the racist Jewish army are not mentioned. There seems having been a big censorship within the Encyclopaedia Judaica in the Zionism article. See here the facts:

-- "Jewish colonies" as agricultural settlements by the Jewish Colonial Association ICA with
-- European Jewish refugees 1933-1945
-- European Jewish refugees after 1945 (D.P.s)
-- Hungarian Jews in 1956
-- Jews from northern Africa after Sinai campaign of 1956
-- Eichmann trial in 1961 and anti-Semitic riots in Uruguay in 1961
(from: Uruguay; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica 1971, Vol. 16, col. 14)
-- <Although a census of the Jewish population has not been taken, it is estimated that about 50,000 Jews live in Uruguay (1970), 48,000 of them in the capital, Montevideo. About 1,200 Jews are thought to live in the interior, and some 90 Jewish families lived in Paysandú, the second largest city. Seventy percent of the Jews are East European, 15% West European, 12% Sephardim, and 3% Hungarian.>
(from: Uruguay; In: Encyclopaedia Judaica 1971, Vol. 16, col. 11)
see: *Uruguay

There was no emigration wave to the eternal war zone of Palestine against the Arabs since 1948. The Jews in Uruguay live more or less in peace. It seems that Venezuela was a refuge for Jews who did not want to be bothered by the racist Zionist madness]].



<Venezuela

[Active racist Zionist organizations in Venezuela since 1949]

[[Jews came from Portugal, from North Africa, from eastern Europe between the World Wars, and from Central Europe since 1933 and after 1945, and after 1958 Jewish influx came from Egypt, Hungary and racist Zionist Free Mason CIA Herzl Israel. Racist Zionism was short-lived before 1948, see: *Venezuela]].

The [[racist]] Zionist Organization has been the most active and influential institution of this small community since its reorganization in 1949. It works together with the Ashkenazi and Sephardi sectors, as well as with B'nai B'rith and the [[racist]] Jewish National Fund. Despite their limited number, the following youth movements also operate:

-- [[racist]] Ha-Shomer ha-Za'ir (ha-Ẓa'ir),
-- [[racist]] Benei Akiva,
-- [[racist]] Unión de Jovenes Hebreos [[Hebrew Youth Union]] (est. 1955),

which form the Federación (col. 1126)

Universitaria Sionista Sudamericana [[South American Zionist Universitarian Federation]].

WIZO maintains branches in the capital and in the interior of the country. Affiliation with the Federación can also be individual. It collaborates with the [[racist]] Instituto Cultural Venezuela-Israel [[Cultural Venezuela-Israel Institute]].> (col. 1127)

[[There was no emigration wave to the eternal war zone of Palestine against the Arabs since 1948. The Jews in Venezuela live in peace. It seems Venezuela was a refuge for Jews who did not want to be bothered by the racist Zionist madness]].



<Central America

Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): [[racist]] Zionism,
                  vol. 16, col. 1126: Parade of [[racist]] Zionist youth
                  in Port of Spain, Trinidad, May 16, 1948, in honor of
                  the establishment of the [[racist Zionist Free Mason
                  CIA Herzl]] State of Israel. Courtesy Central Zionist
                  Archives, Jerusalem
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): [[racist]] Zionism, vol. 16, col. 1126: Parade of [[racist]] Zionist youth in Port of Spain, Trinidad, May 16, 1948, in honor of the establishment of the [[racist Zionist Free Mason CIA Herzl]] State of Israel. Courtesy Central Zionist Archives, Jerusalem

Despite their small size, the Jewish communities of Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, and Panama have organized [[racist]] Zionist institutions. In El Salvador they have functioned since 1946 and enjoy the cooperation of non-Jewish intellectuals and government figures. In Panama and Costa Rica, [[racist]] Zionist activities have found support among the political non-Jewish personalities who have also sponsored relations with the [[racist Zionist Free Mason CIA Herzl]] State of Israel. The [[racist]] Zionist movement in the region has increased its activities since 1965 in the wake of the formation of the Federación de Comunidades de America Central [[Central American Communities Federation]], in which the [[racist]] Zionist Organization is also represented.

[R.P.RA.]> (col. 1127)

[[There was no big emigration wave to the eternal war zone of Palestine against the Arabs since 1948. The Jews in Central America live more or less in peace. It seems Central America was a refuge for Jews who did not want to be bothered by the racist Zionist madness]].

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Sources
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Zionism, vol. 16,
                    col. 1123-1124
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Zionism, vol. 16, col. 1123-1124
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Zionism, vol. 16,
                    col. 1125-1126
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Zionism, vol. 16, col. 1125-1126
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Zionism, vol. 16,
                    col. 1127-1128
Encyclopaedia Judaica (1971): Zionism, vol. 16, col. 1127-1128

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